2011-04-27 MISC: AL,TN,MS,KY,OH,IN,WV,GA

rdale

EF5
Mar 1, 2004
7,389
968
21
51
Lansing, MI
skywatch.org
Good (and of course - expected) news...

TUSCALOOSA, Alabama -- The city says the number of missing people in Tuscaloosa has dropped to 80. The number had ranged as high as 340 on Monday.
 

jeremy wilson

Good (and of course - expected) news...

TUSCALOOSA, Alabama -- The city says the number of missing people in Tuscaloosa has dropped to 80. The number had ranged as high as 340 on Monday.
Awesome! Was wondering and hoping at the number this would drop to.
 

cwachal

EF0
Feb 21, 2011
13
0
0
So far it looks like right around 110 confirmed tornadoes on the 27th

if you include those that happened with the 24 hours (before 8 AM on the 28th) then the number is 124 confirmed tornadoes within 24 hours
 
Jun 21, 2004
1,528
33
11
Kearney, NE
bigstormpicture.com
A must hear post outbreak chat - that is a bit different from the normal post storm discussion- but just as critical: http://www.weatherbrains.com/audio/wb050211.mp3
I haven't listened to that show in a while - do they still spend 60% of their shows trying somehow to bring up Global Warming so they can all pat each other on the back for reinforcing each others beliefs? I always used to think that show was such a shameful waste of good air-talent, as they'd take extremely intelligent and experienced scientist guests and then badger the hell out of them with one dimensional rhetorical fallacies about their own pet beliefs until the guests were audibly annoyed. It was like watching Glenn Beck, only the theatrics weren't as good.
 
Nov 23, 2005
644
0
5
Colorado Springs
So far it looks like right around 110 confirmed tornadoes on the 27th

if you include those that happened with the 24 hours (before 8 AM on the 28th) then the number is 124 confirmed tornadoes within 24 hours
Is there a good source article that says this? Also, how many F-5 tornados were confirmed on April 27th? There is so much misinformation in the media about the number of confirmed tornadoes vs. LSRs, and the number of violent tornadoes.
 

John Farley

Supporter
Apr 1, 2004
1,635
895
21
Pagosa Springs, CO
www.johnefarley.com
Is there a good source article that says this? Also, how many F-5 tornados were confirmed on April 27th? There is so much misinformation in the media about the number of confirmed tornadoes vs. LSRs, and the number of violent tornadoes.
151 confirmed by damage surveys as of yesterday. I compiled a list of the tracks confirmed by damage surveys, and provided the link in another thread, but here it is for anyone that missed it.

http://www.johnefarley.com/tornadotracks04-2011.htm
 
Jun 5, 2009
104
4
5
San Antonio, TX
Saw that but the audio was just making my ears bleed. Still have not heard many first-hand accounts of the impact that the power outages in some communities from the earlier storms might have had on the situation. I've heard antectodal references to NWS transmitters being out in some locales and spotty electricy/internet in others. Any one heard anything specific?
 
Nov 23, 2005
644
0
5
Colorado Springs
151 confirmed by damage surveys as of yesterday. I compiled a list of the tracks confirmed by damage surveys, and provided the link in another thread, but here it is for anyone that missed it.

http://www.johnefarley.com/tornadotracks04-2011.htm
Thanks very much John! So this is outbreak is not bigger than the Superoutbreak?

:edit: OK, just read the Superoutbreak of 74 has 148 confirmed tornadoes, so this event on April 27th is officially the biggest 24 hour outbreak of tornadoes in recorded history in the US. Amazing.
 
Apr 22, 2010
41
31
6
Richmond, VA
New close look video from Tuscaloosa.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2A3BYtc00I8

That guys commentary and attitude hacks me off. He's either incredibly ignorant of the tornado's strength or could care less that it is probably killing people at that time because it looks "awesome".

anyway...when the full tornado comes into view, look at the horizontal funnels almost at ground level. I hadn't seen those in other footage.
 
Apr 16, 2010
274
1
0
Omaha, NE
I was just reading the damage survey report from NWS Birmingham. Pretty amazing stuff.
(Sorry if this has been mentioned before)

A 2 TON UTILITY TRAILER FROM THIS LOCATION
WAS FOUND A MILE AWAY...WITH A 2.5 FOOT IMPACT CRATER WHERE IT
LANDED.
Or,

THE MAIN INDICATORS OF HACKLEBURG HAVING EF-5
DAMAGE IS THE TOSSING OF VEHICLES UPWARDS OF 150-200 YARDS
I'm still amazed there were not more EF-5 ratings, that's just my opinion though.
 

cwachal

EF0
Feb 21, 2011
13
0
0
Does that 151 include long track tornadoes that crossed office lines... as one tornado and not 2 tornadoes. I have recounted them and still only come up with 115 tornadoes when you remove the duplicate entries
 
Mar 26, 2009
174
13
5
Bismarck, ND
Thanks very much John! So this is outbreak is not bigger than the Superoutbreak?

:edit: OK, just read the Superoutbreak of 74 has 148 confirmed tornadoes, so this event on April 27th is officially the biggest 24 hour outbreak of tornadoes in recorded history in the US. Amazing.
The spreadsheet he compiled were all tornadoes from April 26th-April 28th... that's more than the 24 hours. I also believe that there will be more continued tracks once the WFOs can coordinate a little better. I believe we're still a far way from knowing if this breaks the super outbreak.
 

Glen Turner

Good (and of course - expected) news...

TUSCALOOSA, Alabama -- The city says the number of missing people in Tuscaloosa has dropped to 80. The number had ranged as high as 340 on Monday.
It's now 75. "Of the missing, 22 are now classified as Level 1. Mayor Walt Maddox said that means that person who reported them missing had spoken with them within two weeks of the April 27 tornado."
 
Aug 4, 2008
203
35
11
Nashville, TN
Saw that but the audio was just making my ears bleed. Still have not heard many first-hand accounts of the impact that the power outages in some communities from the earlier storms might have had on the situation. I've heard antectodal references to NWS transmitters being out in some locales and spotty electricy/internet in others. Any one heard anything specific?
I was sitting in Jasper, Al by 1pm and can tell you that the very early MCV that went through, crippled communications. I worked Hwy 78/I-22 from Hamilton to Birmingham and had trouble obtaining data through Verizon all day long. It made for a very dangerous day in that area.
 

John Farley

Supporter
Apr 1, 2004
1,635
895
21
Pagosa Springs, CO
www.johnefarley.com
Does that 151 include long track tornadoes that crossed office lines... as one tornado and not 2 tornadoes. I have recounted them and still only come up with 115 tornadoes when you remove the duplicate entries


Wherever I found a tornado that crossed from one CWA into another, I counted it as just one tornado. I am pretty sure that, in the 151 number, there are none that are double-counted - although there are 2 or 3 in there that may have crossed into some other CWA but haven't been surveyed in the other CWA. I have six in the database that were confirmed by damage surveys to have occurred in more than one CWA.

A couple other points. First, I believe the 148 total in the 1974 Super Outbreak was for more than one day. I pretty much followed the definition Bobby Prentice quoted from Grazulis in a thread in W & C. So with at least 151 different tornadoes, this outbreak does exceed the 1974 record. Second, the total of 151 includes only tornadoes confirmed by damage surveys - and it is possible I may have missed a handful of those. However, NWS offices can and do enter tornadoes into the "confirmed" category by means other than damage surveys, such as video evidence and reliable spotter and/or emergency manager reports. So not every tornado that ends up confirmed is confirmed by means of a damage survey. So the total for this outbreak will certainly be significantly more than 151, and other means of confirmation may explain the figure of 178 cited by CNN.
 
Mar 24, 2010
16
0
0
Wichita, KS
The weatherbrains show audio was interesting. Fascinating recollections of the experiences from that side of the table. Dr. Tim got quite upset (p.o.'d actually) towards the end of the show. Anybody else catch that? He was particularly upset with an experience he had with someone from either NSSL or SPC within the last week.
 
Apr 14, 2011
310
33
11
Alexandria, LA
The NOAA's current clearinghouse page for the event at this time shows 197 tornadoes surveyed.

I'm not sure it's above board to insist the Super Outbreak was worse even if there were a larger number of tornadoes within a 24 hour period, just for that reason alone. I don't believe the Super Outbreak produced tornadoes continuously over a three-day period. As a total event, April 25-27, 2011 outbreak is unquestionably worse. I don't see how there's a reasonable debate. "Within 24 hours" is arbitrary and meaningless.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

John Farley

Supporter
Apr 1, 2004
1,635
895
21
Pagosa Springs, CO
www.johnefarley.com
More surveys out today; 170 confirmed tornadoes now on the spreadsheet. Pretty clearly a record outbreak at this point. I know there are sources indicating larger numbers surveyed, and there may well be, but what is on the spreadsheet is what I can find on the Web pages or public information statements from the NWS offices affected. If anyone knows of a surveyed tornado not on the spreadsheet, please PM me with a link to relevant documentation.
 

rdale

EF5
Mar 1, 2004
7,389
968
21
51
Lansing, MI
skywatch.org
I'm not sure it's above board to insist the Super Outbreak was worse even if there were a larger number of tornadoes within a 24 hour period, just for that reason alone.
Pretty simple - if you're talking a 24-hr span, the SO is the worst outbreak on record. If you want to make it a 72 hour span, then this one was the worst. Depends on how you want to judge them. But it's subjective either way. The weather world doesn't operate in timeframes, those are human inventions.
 
Feb 14, 2005
879
22
11
Charleston, South Carolina
Pretty simple - if you're talking a 24-hr span, the SO is the worst outbreak on record. If you want to make it a 72 hour span, then this one was the worst. Depends on how you want to judge them. But it's subjective either way. The weather world doesn't operate in timeframes, those are human inventions.
Well, regardless of the records, I'm most interested to see a technical report from NOAA on the instant event. It certainly deserves one. The technical report on the 1974 outbreak was a gem and well-described the synoptic conditions that preceded such an event. (It was sent from the Secretary of Commerce, presumably to his immediate superior, but I doubt Tricky Dickey circa 1974 would have been much interested in 700mb temperatures)