2011-04-27 MISC: AL,TN,MS,KY,OH,IN,WV,GA

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Trey Thee

EF2
Mar 29, 2010
191
29
11
Tulsa metro
I'm sure some people did some stupid things, didn't pay attention, and got themselves killed, but from the severity of the damage reports, it seems evident that many people DID the right things, took cover in the safest areas of their houses, and got killed anyway. The home I live in here in Kansas, while well-constructed by 1975 standards (when it was built), is a split-level ranch without a true basement area. I think it would stand up OK to a garden-variety tornado, but if anything worse than an EF-3 hit my house, I'd probably be dead, and I sure know what to do during a storm.

All the comments about people being stupid seem pretty damn insensitive to me.
Well I've made that comment once or twice, I'm not trying to be insensitive but have you read the interviews or watched the interviews with people saying they saw it on tv, they heard the sirens but didn't think it would hit them? Another person heard the sirens but didn't want to change the channel on the tv, etc etc etc...sorry if I offended you, that wasn't my intent. The reality is you are correct, an EF5 would make any structure above ground level unsafe, but that doesn't mean you sit on the couch sipping your beer.
 
May 2, 2010
192
30
11
Springfield, IL
There's a BIG difference between "missing" and "unaccounted for."

I agree, but with each passing day and hour the "unaccounted for" (people who have not yet been contacted) become more and more likely to be genuinely "missing" (vanished without a trace or under circumstances that lead one to suspect they are dead or injured).

In 2004 when an F-3 struck Utica, IL, I was not able to reach my parents for several hours after it hit. They had no power and no phone service so they could not call me, my brother or anyone else to let us know they were OK. A friend was able to get into town to check on them and after verifying that they were OK and their house was intact, called me and my brother to let us know. For those first several hours after the tornado, they were "unaccounted for." If no one had been able to reach them that night, they would have remained "unaccounted for" until the next morning, when I was able to get there (I lived about 75 miles away).

However, if either I or their friends had arrived at what used to be their home, found it reduced to rubble or to a bare slab (they had no basement) and no sign of them anywhere, then they would have been "missing."

Perhaps the authorities in Tuscaloosa should, if possible, clarify how many of the 400 fall into each category (not yet contacted vs. completely vanished).
 
May 31, 2004
1,895
43
11
Peotone, IL
illinoisstormchasers.com
After looking at the damage photos and close ups.... I think it is QUITE possible that people DID take shelter and acted appropriately. Looking at what is left of their homes factoring in they had no basements they could very well have just been taken away and blown out of their houses. It is terribly sad to be in an interior closet wrapped in blankets, pillows, mattress and have that beast just rip you and your house away. Also another factor is much of N. AL was without power anyway, so it is possible that they really didn't get the warning until it was right on them.
 

Bob Wagner

Enthusiast
Jan 14, 2011
8
0
0
Slidell, LA
This picture (from FOX News) is the most impressive piece of evidence I have seen so far.



There's also the shredded railroad bridge from the Tuscaloosa overflight video...

Edit: To clarify, that picture is apparently from Mississippi, so it may have come from the one tornado that has already been officially rated as EF-5.
My understanding is that, yes, this picture is from the Smithville, MS tornado.
 
Jun 14, 2010
50
0
5
44
Chautauqua Co., NY
My understanding is that, yes, this picture is from the Smithville, MS tornado.
I was wondering if it was a tube in the road. At first I wondered if it was a case of isolated flash flooding, but you certainly don't see any of the typical mud build up after something like that. Guessing the wind through the tube was so great it lifted it out. So is it considered scoured?
 
Mar 17, 2009
108
2
5
Manhattan, KS
I was wondering if it was a tube in the road. At first I wondered if it was a case of isolated flash flooding, but you certainly don't see any of the typical mud build up after something like that. Guessing the wind through the tube was so great it lifted it out. So is it considered scoured?
I agree and if you look at the tree next to it you will see part of it I believe. Still very impressive as there was still dirt and asphalt on top of it.
 
Jan 7, 2008
537
7
11
46
Bryan, TX
Didn't see the NOAA page updating the outbreak posted yet: April 2011 is currently the all-time record of any month now for tornadoes:
NWS’s preliminary estimate is that there have been more than 600 tornadoes thus far during the month of April 2011. # The previous record number of tornadoes during the month of April was 267 tornadoes set in April 1974.

# The previous record number of tornadoes during any month was 542 tornadoes set in May 2003.
2nd deadliest too--April 27. One of my coworkers has relatives in Tuscaloosa and said that they were ok, but some neighbors were trapped in the wreckage and the sounds of moans had ceased. Why weren't more National Guard or other rescuers called in for quicker extractions of people? I understand the general idea of how inaccessible some things were, but there must have been and be some other ways of putting even further state/national resources earlier into the rescue?
http://www.noaanews.noaa.gov/april_2011_tornado_information.html
 

Drew.Gardonia

342 confirmed dead and continuing to climb.

http://www.cnn.com/2011/US/04/30/severe.weather/index.html?hpt=T1

whats interesting is CNN is saying this is the 2nd deadliest, but according to AlabamaWX that's not the case. This would be the 3rd deadliest


http://www.alabamawx.com/?p=7007

1. 747¦Tri-State Outbreak, MO, IN, IL. TN, KY, AL¦March 18, 1925
2. 454¦April 5-6,1936¦AR, TN, AL, MS, GA, SC
3. 330¦March 21-22, 1932¦AL, TN, KY, GA, SC
4. 324¦April 23-24, 1908¦AR, NE, TX, AL, LA, MS
5. 317¦LA/MS¦May 7, 1840
6. 315¦Superoutbreak¦April 3-4, 1974
7. 305¦MO/IL¦May 27, 1896
8. 256¦Palm Sunday Outbreak…IA, WI, IL, IN, MI, OHâ€Â¦April 11, 1965
9. 236¦Flint/Worcester¦June 8-9, 1953
10. 224¦MS/AL/TN¦April 20, 1920
 

Jeff Duda

Resident meteorological expert
Staff member
Oct 7, 2008
3,253
1,953
21
Broomfield, CO
www.meteor.iastate.edu
I'm probably going to have this post removed, but I'm seeing wayyyyy too many duplicated posts in this thread. You guys need to read through the posts before posting yourself. Some people are duplicating the post above theirs (where the posts are separated by several minutes or hours).
 

E. Clark

EF0
Mar 18, 2010
48
0
5
Currently - Tahoe area
NSSL has released an image documenting the rotation tracks of the devastating tornadoes on April 27. Bright reds and yellows show more intense circulations.

The image of the rotation tracks was produced by the On Demand Severe Weather Verification System, part of NSSL’s Warning Decision Support System – Integrated Information (WDSS-II) Multi-Radar/Multi Sensor platform. On Demand is a web-based tool that can be used to help confirm when and where severe weather occurred.

 
342 confirmed dead and continuing to climb.

http://www.cnn.com/2011/US/04/30/severe.weather/index.html?hpt=T1

whats interesting is CNN is saying this is the 2nd deadliest, but according to AlabamaWX that's not the case. This would be the 3rd deadliest


http://www.alabamawx.com/?p=7007

1. 747¦Tri-State Outbreak, MO, IN, IL. TN, KY, AL¦March 18, 1925
2. 454¦April 5-6,1936¦AR, TN, AL, MS, GA, SC
3. 330¦March 21-22, 1932¦AL, TN, KY, GA, SC
4. 324¦April 23-24, 1908¦AR, NE, TX, AL, LA, MS
5. 317¦LA/MS¦May 7, 1840
6. 315¦Superoutbreak¦April 3-4, 1974
7. 305¦MO/IL¦May 27, 1896
8. 256¦Palm Sunday Outbreak…IA, WI, IL, IN, MI, OHâ€Â¦April 11, 1965
9. 236¦Flint/Worcester¦June 8-9, 1953
10. 224¦MS/AL/TN¦April 20, 1920
I believe they are referring to a single day event.

There were possibly some even larger death tolls in the late 1800's and in the 1930', but no official count was ever made. In addition, the sad politics at the time would not allow certain groups of people to be counted.

W.
 
May 2, 2010
192
30
11
Springfield, IL
As of right now there are at least 75 deaths attributable to the Tuscaloosa-Birmingham tornado (45 in Tuscaloosa and at least 30 in BHM).

I'm guessing that when a final fatality count is achieved and deaths in other communities along its path are included, chances are it will set another grim milestone: first single tornado in 58 years (since Flint MI in 1953) to kill more than 100 people.
 

jshields

that is absolutely amazing! as of this image they show the tuscaloosa/birmingham tornado as one very long track. something i noticed though, and noticed when i was watching the storm on radar, was the jog to the north the storm took right before birmingham. you can clearly see this on that map. i know it still went through a populated area of northern Birmingham, but I wonder if it would have been even worse if it went right through central and downtown Birmingham?

also as of last night on CNN's Anderson Cooper, they said there were still over 450 people unaccounted for in Tuscaloosa alone!
 

Drew.Gardonia

NSSL has released an image documenting the rotation tracks of the devastating tornadoes on April 27. Bright reds and yellows show more intense circulations.

The image of the rotation tracks was produced by the On Demand Severe Weather Verification System, part of NSSL’s Warning Decision Support System – Integrated Information (WDSS-II) Multi-Radar/Multi Sensor platform. On Demand is a web-based tool that can be used to help confirm when and where severe weather occurred.

im not sure I agree with how accurate this really is, because it's showing red in a lot of areas that didnt even have tornadoes on Wednesday.
 
May 2, 2010
192
30
11
Springfield, IL
it's showing red in a lot of areas that didnt even have tornadoes on Wednesday.

These are ROTATION tracks, not tornado tracks. There were MANY tornado warnings issued on Wednesday for "possible tornadoes," "thunderstorms capable of producing tornadoes" or "severe thunderstorms with strong rotation" in areas that did not have any official tornado reports.

For every supercell that did produce a tornado, there were probably many others that COULD have produced but didn't.
 
May 2, 2010
192
30
11
Springfield, IL
Also, re the high number of missing/unaccounted for in Tuscaloosa (supposedly it's increased to 500 +): could some, perhaps many, of them be U of Alabama students who lived off campus and when their apartments or other accomodations were destroyed, damaged, or left without power, they simply packed up and went home without telling their landlords or others? Since the university canceled classes for the rest of the semester (which only had a week left to go anyway) I could easily see this happening.
 
Jan 29, 2004
1,018
6
11
Canton, Ohio
www.myspace.com
Elaine, the number of missing/unaccounted for in Tuscaloosa is odd/disturbing. This wasn't like an earthquake where it levels a city. There should be some forms of communication down there such as phone service in some areas, or cell phone service. We're 3 days post event. It seems to me that the number of people unaccounted for shouldn't be that high. So, either they have their info messed up due to chaos, or the toll is going to go sky high. I hope I'm wrong about that, but it just seems to me that the number of people missing shouldn't be that high.